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20121226
20130103
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
on you is seeing the broadway show "ben franklin in paris." why? >> i volunteered to go to vietnam, it was an advisory effort, it was not leading u.s. combat troops. a lot of people told me i was crazy. what are you doing this for? there is no career enhancement for you going over there and advising them and that sort of thing. i told them they don't understand. it is a sense of duty. i'm an instrument of war. i was not articulating my possession well. -- my position very well. then i saw "ben franklin in paris" and this wonderful last scene where ben franklin stands up about how will i find those americans then. will they love liberty given it to their crib for nothing. if you are not free you are lost without hope. and are they willing to die for it? that is one question that you have to ask, are you willing to die for it and the answer must be, yes, sir, i would. that is why i was going to vietnam. i have never forgotten those words. >> there's another point where you talk about the civilians in washington seeing too many rambo movies. >> there was an element pressuring, i felt,
of sight. until some believe their own rhetoric -- read ben bernanke -- about moderation. but when the global minotaur was mortally wounded, it left the global economy in disarray. it has put the world in permanent crisis. the minotaur was slain by a brave warrior named theseus. its death ushered a new era of tragedy, history, philosophy. our very own global minotaur died as the victim of wall street bankers. what will its demise bring? should be hope for a new era in which wealth does not require poverty? will be develop a system where no longer will abstract power waned while others get stronger? the global minotaur will be remembered as a remarkable piece to whose rain created and destroyed the illusion that the global economy was stable. thank you. [applause] right. questions? i think i am going to moderate myself. ok, you have to line up. this is the way you do it here, isn't it? >> that is a brilliant vision of where we have been. can you elaborate a little bit more on where you see us going? >> very briefly, i think that we are in a state of sustained bewilderment. because,
to -- thank you very much. i'd like to invite ben santer up here to present the award to dr. hansen. ben is a member of the jury and a climate scientist in his own right at lawrence livermore lab. >> jim, you and steve were pioneers of the frontiers of climate science, exploring the role of the oceans in climate change, the role of clouds, the role of aerosol particles, and i could spend a lot of time recounting your scientific contributions. i won't -- i just wanna tell you one very brief story. back in 1988, i was doing my postdoc in hamburg, you testified in front of congress. you said, we see the signal emerging from the noise. that had huge influence on me and on hundreds, thousands of my colleagues. the idea that we could see some coherent human-caused warming signal emerging from the year- to-year or decade-to-decade noise of natural climate variability, it certainly had a discernable influence on my career and on the science i chose to do. germans have a word, zivilcourage, there's not really an english translation for it. and what it means as best as i can translate it is, indiv
: is there any possibility ben bernanke and tim geithner could both be replaced? from what i have read, they both have a background or some dealings with the basics and will street. my impression is they are in bed with big banks in wall street and favor them. their policies have always favored those guys. that may be part of the reason they were never held accountable for the things that happened five in 2008. guest: there is no doubt they did work together on the tarp legislation during the financial collapse of late 2008. ben bernanke was the chairman of the federal reserve. tim geithner it was the head of the federal reserve. i cannot remember whether ben bernanke's term is coming up in 2014. there is talk that tim geithner may be the next fed chair. it is quite likely we will have a new fed chair some time during obama's second term. host: when you say chatter, is this the white house getting that out to reporters? guest: like wall street, people talk. if ben bernanke were to leave the fed, tim geithner would be a natural candidate. it would be natural he would be considered. whether he woul
such conversations we're having with retiring members. jonas freight sit down with ben nelson -- join us for a sit down with ben nelson. he helped forge a domination. that is 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. interviews with two retired house members. first jerry lewis and later, a conversation with california lynn woolsey. the epa administrator has announced her decision to resign her posts in january. the chief environmental watchdog is stepping down after a nearly four this year tenure , new controls on coal-fired plants. jackson found herself caught between administration pledges to solve controversial problems and steady resistant from groups that complaint the rules destroy jobs and make it harder for american companies to compete internationally. that is from the ap. steny hoyer will talk about the looming fiscal cliff during a briefing later today. that will be about 2:15 eastern and we'll have that life for you here on c-span. kent conrad is retiring after 26 years in office. he talked about partisanship in the senate and his time working on economic issues including his time on the bowle
ben bernanke -- about moderation. but when the global minotaur was mortally wounded, it left the global economy in disarray. it has put the world in permanent crisis. the minotaur was slain by a brave warrior named theseus. its death ushered a new era of tragedy, history, philosophy. our very own global minotaur died as the victim of wall street bankers. what will its demise bring? should be hope for a new era in which wealth does not require poverty? will be develop a system where no longer will abstract power waned while others get stronger? the global minotaur will be remembered as a remarkable piece to whose rain created and destroyed the illusion that the global economy was stable. thank you. [applause] right. questions? i think i am going to moderate myself. ok, you have to line up. this is the way you do it here, isn't it? >> that is a brilliant vision of where we have been. can you elaborate a little bit more on where you see us going? >> very briefly, i think that we are in a state of sustained bewilderment. because, let's face it. in the 1930's, the new deal, despit
interviews with retiring members of congress. at 8:00 p.m. easter, senator ben nelson of nebraska talks about his two terms and his time as a member of the gang of six. then at 8:40, represented jerry lewis of california on his 17 terms in congress. that is followed at 9:15 with representative lynn woolsey on her anti-war work. that is thursday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, here on c-span. >> tonight, a discussion on corporations in pursuit of high stock values. then a group economist explains why he believes the u.s. is responsible for the global financial crisis. later, interviews with retiring members of congress. on tomorrow morning's washington journal, we are asking business owners to call in and talk about the fiscal cliff and their plans for next year. then we will continue with the forecast for the coming years housing market. that is all about more discussion of the fiscal cliff negotiations as congress returns to washington. we will be joined by steve forbes. later, discussion on background checks, how they work, who gets them, and when they are required. our guest is matt bennett. "washin
to understand the relationship and goodwill are real. in 2005, our son ben had significant surgery over the summer. later in the term, he had more. he called me every day on my cell phone to see how ben was doing. he was a member of the other political party. and that is the relationship. we are parents first. he understood what my family was going through. you can always build on that. you can always find common ground. he ended up voting on environmental legislation with me after he told me that he was not a tree hugger and he would not do it. it does work and it is important. you have to focus on what you have in common with the people of new hampshire have in common >> growing up in everett -- have in common. -->> and growing up in a republican family and you are of a different party, you realize they're wonderful people on the other side of the spectrum. we worked closely with the republicans, especially the women senators for the yard. kelly had the great race to call me after i won. we talk about the yard and our commitment to the military and to veterans. we share a lot. we need
-called fiscal cliff was coined by ben bernanke. the story from "roll call." "it could be reached over this weekend." were heard from the house rules committee chairman yesterday. they are taking steps in advance to extend these tax cuts. a deal could be on the floor today if there is an agreement. from "the washington times" this morning. "offers fly, but still no agreement" is the headline. mitch mcconnell bypassed senator reid to speak directly to the vice president. host: mark is joining us. your thoughts from manassas, a virginia. caller: good morning. thank you for c-span. we voters know this country has a lot of issues going forward. if they can take a bite out of these difficult issues one at a time, how will they make sure this country is put on a better footing? this is item number one in a list of hundredsd. -- in a list of hundreds. they are not willing to raise any taxes. just rolling back some of the bush-era tax cuts. when you're having issues, you have to make tough choices. host: thank you for the call. the damage may be done. some of the comments yesterday. [video cli
. in 2005, our son ben had significant surgery over the summer. later in the term, he had more. he called me every day on cell phone to see how ben was doing. and that is the relationship. we are parents first. he understood what my family was going through. you can always build on that. you can always find common ground. he ended up voting on environmental legislation with mefter he told me that he was not a tree hugger and he would not do it. it does work and it is important. you have to focus on what you have in common with the people of new hampshire have in common >> growing up in everett -- have in common. >> and growing up in a republican family and you are of a different party, you realize they're wonderful people on the other side of the spectrum. we worked closely with the republicans, especially the women senators for the yard. kelly had the great race to call me after i w. we talk about the yard and our commitment to the military and to veterans. we share a lot. we need to remember that. >> back to the table of seven kids -- >> i feel i was born bipartisan. my mother was republic
this week and there were a few issues raised by support. number one is the religion has totally for ben for gay people to get married. second of all we have others who did mention earlier about equal opportunity that every person has the right to get married regardless of whether they are male or female. the last plane like to make it say what this young person who can say to to me they shouldn't have been voted for the make your mark ballot. instead it should have been young people and the police, which is by far more important. thank you. [applause] >> and i'm not just to say because they see a small number of people standing up who have spoken before and i welcome your csm, but in fairness to people who haven't had a chance to speak, i need to be looking for those who have not spoken before the debate. the woman in the back row. yes, it is you. >> i am representing. it is love, care and dedication between two people. if those two people know they love each other, is it unfair to say they need to have it written on paper and writing on paper for his love more important. there are othe
recently had with nebraska democratic senator ben nelson. he served two terms and was part of the so-called gang of 14. that is at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. here is a brief look. >> what is your thought about the art of compromise and how much it is now viewed in this city? >> well, you know, is valued to talk about it. everybody back home want people to come back to washington and work together. and then they send people back here who have committed not to work together. that makes it very difficult. if you have in the senate in block of individuals who will not compromise and think of compromise as a for that -- as a four-letter word, which is not, then it becomes difficult to merge ideas and find compromises and accommodations in process or implementation as opposed to your principles. no one is asked to compromise his or her principles when you are talking about compromise. maybe how you go about doing something, not exactly eliminating your view about one thing or another. i think the word compromise is over used, underutilized and misunderstood by an awful lot of people
. we spoke with ben nelson. that is followed by a jerry lewis -- by jerry lewis. senator ben nelson is retiring fr the senate aft 12 yea he spoke to us about why he thinks compromise in the senate is not a four-letter word. this is 40 minutes. >> thank you for spending a half-hour with us to talk about your 12 years in washington. it ended with the reelection of barack obama. if you could think of adjectives, what would they be to describe these seven years? >> interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. full of opportunities for the country. there were good times during these 12 years, laced together with some that were not so good. 9/11. the anthrax scare. there were also positive things. the election of barack obama i thought was a very positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way out of a fiscal of this. abyss.thi i could not have imagined a better time to have been here with all of the things that have happened. >> let me ask you to look back over those 12 years and ask what the high point was. >> when we could work together. maybe the single even
and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of around 2% -- the conventional wisdom was that should -- that this president should not be reelected. as you take a look at what happened two weeks ago, how do you assess this? >> let me just say first that i made a very good living and politics betting against conventional wisdom. it is a general principle of mine that the conventional wisdom is almost always wrong and it was wrong here. it was wrong here because what we often do in political circles and journalism is that we look at what happened in the last election or past elections and we think it is prescriptive for what it will happen -- for what will happen in the f
could get really volatile next week if ben austen this situation. host: cliff talks down to the wire. guest: that's right. majority leader harry reid yesterday said we might not even have time to get a deal even if we reach an agreement, just because of the mechanics of the house and senate and how long it takes to pass legislation. i think if they get a deal, they can somehow get it through. there's no room for error. if they come out of the meeting at the white house today and everyone shrugged their shoulders and says there's no way we can do this, that sends a signal to the american people that we are going over the cliff. you think?doe guest: we're going over the cliff probably. republicans are so dug in on this issue. they got into the house and senate based on their views on taxes, medicare, social security. it is hard to imagine in the next three days they will have some huge concession and reversed the views they have held 20, 30, 40 years. at the same token, maybe they will say what will happen to the economy is so damaging that i have to compromise my position, and that wi
cuts. the concern we have and that is prompted by ben bernanke or the congressional budget office or lot of outsiders, looking at the way the fiscal cliff is structured, where finds that it actually has too much debt as a production, and i say that as someone who generally does not worry about too much depth as a production, because politicians are so unlikely to reduce the deficit much, but if we went over the cliff, there would be in too what steps the production. takes a wax and domestic discretionary spending -- it takes a big whack at domestic discretionary spending. so we should replace the fiscal cliff with more thoughtful deficit-reduction. make sure that you reduce the deficit in a way that is phased in gradually so we don't seem too much this year. we are all aware the economy's not going as well as it should be. if there's a way to do this more gradually, it would be better for the economy, but you need to lock in the changes so we know we are serious and stick with them, and that it is done more thoughtfully. so that it is an across-the- board hit at many but not all p
. congressman dan boren of oklahoma and congressman ben chandler of kentucky. both members will be greatly missed and i appreciate their service on the intelligence committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from michigan. mr. rogers: could i inquire how much time remains? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan has 5 1/2 minutes remaining. mr. rogers: i would yield myself as much time as i might consume. again, i want to thank my ranking member, both staffs in the intelligence committee, for the long hours, hard work, and thorough detailed work on the budgets and the classified annex of this report. it will allow us, and i think it should, alleviate many of the concerns of -- good concerns of mr. kucinich and others who are concerned about these activities. and again i think it's important to reiterate that we have the same concerns. which is why we are so thorough and why we have joined together in a bipartisan way to increase the level of congressional oversight, to increase our impact and influence on the policies of the intelligence commu
comprise the seven republicans and seven democrats to spearhead with john warner, john mccain, and ben nelson. it was born to avert an institutional crisis as a result of repeated, systematic filibustering of president bush's judicial nominees in the senate. in response, the republican majority were going to exercise the nuclear option and it would have jettisoned longstanding rules requiring 60 votes to end a filibuster. the 60-vote threshold has always been protecting the rights of the minority, but when it becomes just a simple majority vote? how that happened? it would have had enormous implications for the future of the senate. just as we were about to cross the political rubicon, the gang of 14 forced a pact based on mutual trust that we would only support a filibuster under what we labeled as extraordinary circumstances and we would oppose the nuclear option. it embodies the very manifestation of the power of sense is building. as this body contemplates changes to its rules in the next congress, i would urge all my colleagues who are returning to follow the gang of 14 and exerci
are nothing but criminals, the better. host: and from this, the term fiscal cliff originally came from ben bernanke. let's hear what president obama said last night before heading back to his vacation in hawaii. [video clip] >> more than 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses under this law will not see their income tax rise. millions of families will continue to receive tax breaks to help raise their kids and send them to college. companies will continue to receive tax credits for research they do and investments they make and the clean energy jobs they create. 2 million americans out of work that are out there looking every day will continue to receive unemployment benefits as long as they are actively looking for job. but i think we all recognize this lot is just one step in the broader effort to strengthen our economy and brought an opportunity for everybody. -- this law. the fact is the deficit is still too high. we are still investing too little in the things that we need for the economy to grow as fast as it should. that is why speaker john boehner and i originally tried to ne
of the wall street journal. >> we will break away. live now to the capital. that is senator ben nelson from nebraska, retiring, make your marks on c-span. -- making remarks on c-span. thank you. we thought we would catch a moment of his comments, which were brief. we're standing by four senators coming back from their party caucuses. caller: the other thing is harry reid has not voted on over 40 bills the republicans have put up there, and he blames republicans. , isopod you were supposed to bring bills up there and talk about them and vote on then. they have not pass a budget in over four years. they are not being responsible for that. guest: that is what makes him such a powerful figure. they said we sent you the legislation that would help the deficit cannot help create more jobs, and democrats in the senate have not acted. democrats say those are partisan bills with no bipartisan support. that is why the leader -- senate leader reid is going to be at the white house today because his signing off on anything is vital. guest: one of the things we sell was financial markets to end it out m
is #fiscalcliff. ben says "still hard for me to believe that the house will force the nation ought the fiscal cliff into recession, which is what amending this bill would do." "i just finished reading the senate bill. this is not a bad deal, it is however only one step, many to go." "the fiscal cliff deal is an increase in taxes to support wasteful government spending. nothing to celebrate over." "we are getting a raw deal. more taxes. no cuts. not the way to balance a budget." >> we're going to take a call from daenny. caller: good afternoon. i want to say that it is a shame washington cannot get its act together and do its job on this fiscal cliff. i seriously believe that if they do not get a dozen in this congress that the 113th congress will get it done. host: the hundred 13 congress comes in on thursday. we will be live from capitol hill with that. in the meantime we have at least today and tomorrow of the 112th congress. michelle is in palm bay, a republican. caller: i wish responding to the comments earlier when the guest baker was on about well for -- welfare reform. i see way too ma
whatever the fiscal cliff, a term coined by ben bernanke. john is on the phone from connecticut. caller: i think it is good, but i think we should have gotten a deeper -- i would have liked to have seen 250. i also find its disturbing it sound like we are being referred to as the people instead of fellow americans -- i find it disturbing it sounds like we are being referred to as the people instead of fellow americans. it sounds like congress is a noterent body, n.yand they are representing us, and i hope they will turn it around and start representing the people's will. >> you heard the back-and-forth. we expected the house to double out 30 minutes ago, but the last minute speeches by democratic and republican members dealing with the issue of hurricane sandy and the $60 billion package that as part of the relief effort -- the house is back tomorrow. the future of the legislation remains uncertain. jack joins us from idaho. i would say good evening, because it is morning in washington but evening in idaho. >> witnessing this spectacle, it strikes me the total rancor -- when boehner is try
releasing solo albums produced by ben folds two is wonderful himself. she is best known as a social media queen rock-and-roll. she is engaged with her fans through social media and is known for finding her next album via kickstarter, a pay-what- you-like for my music model. welcome amanda. [applause] >> highlight to begin by agreeing that predictions are bullshit and social media is also bullshit. that being said, it helps me a lot. not so much the prediction that i would make, but everything that has happened to me in the last few months, the kickstarter i did that raised over $1 million, it brought a discussion of about my use of twitter and connecting i have done with my audience and my fans. the conversation that i hear happening every year between artists and musicians is that people are beginning to measure the cost of connections. and by that, i mean you have people engaging on your behalf as the artist and engaging constantly with fans. the pros and cons are starting to shake out. the past few months, these sorts of people coming to me are my uncle that is a very successful person
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)

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